Five Card Story: John Locke - aims and methods of education

stories: prev | random | next

a Five Card Flickr story by BSIT101A created Sep 21 2020, 01:07:13 pm. Create a new one!


flickr photo credits: (1) Serenae (2) Intrepid Flame (3) Serenae (4) bionicteaching (5) bionicteaching


about this story

John Locke is persuaded that moral education is more important than education of any other kind. He says the learning should be fun. There's no logical explanation, Locke believes kids should hate studying, and enjoy playing. The only reason kids don't like books as much as they like toys is because they're forced to read, not forced to play. His suggestions include that when children are not in the mood, they should never be compelled to learn; that they should never be beaten or talked to harshly; that they should not be taught, but that they should be engaged in conversation; and that their opinions should be taken seriously.

The majority of parents play a twisted role in the lives of their children. The parents are indulgent when the children are young and need reasonable guidance, when the kids grow up and they can use their own excuse, the parents unexpectedly begin to enforce their will. It is through fear and awe that young children can relate to their parents. A parent can only maintain his authority when a child is a reasonable creature by inspiring love and respect in his son. A grown son should be courted as a friend, he sought his advice and he valued his opinion.

share this story

permalink to story: http://5card.cogdogblog.com/show.php?id=46581

Copy/Paste Story

Click once to select, then copy and paste HTML to your own blog/website.

create a different story from these same cards

Do you have another interpretation of the story behind these pictures? Add it to the collection as a new story!


flickr photo credits: (1) Serenae (2) Intrepid Flame (3) Serenae (4) bionicteaching (5) bionicteaching

For security purposes, please enter the correct words matching the images (blame the spammers):

stories: prev | random | next